2/17/13

Mommy! I Shrunk The Trash Can!!!




Taking a break from drawing elephants. Drawing rhinoceroses instead.





These are all the pens I used up in one week. Taking a break from drawing elephants. I am planning to draw another pachyderm herd but right now I am drawing a rhinoceros.  I plan to draw the black, white and Indian rhinoceroses. Albrecht Durer must had fun drawing his Indian rhinoceros. He also made a woodcut, both of the images were based on a written description of a rhinoceros because he never really saw a live specimen.  Durer's drawing and woodcut were the basis of so many misrepresentations of the rhinoceros in several masters' paintings for three centuries. How inaccuracies spread, it happened then, it happens now :)

From Wikipedia: "Dürer's Rhinoceros is the name commonly given to a woodcut executed by German painter and printmaker Albrecht Dürer in 1515.[1] The image was based on a written description and brief sketch by an unknown artist of an Indian rhinoceros that had arrived in Lisbon earlier that year. Dürer never saw the actual rhinoceros, which was the first living example seen in Europe since Roman times. In late 1515, the King of Portugal, Manuel I, sent the animal as a gift for Pope Leo X, but it died in a shipwreck off the coast of Italy in early 1516. A live rhinoceros was not seen again in Europe until a second specimen, named Abada, arrived from India at the court of Sebastian of Portugal in 1577, being later inherited by Philip II of Spain around 1580.[2][3]
 
Dürer's woodcut is not an entirely accurate representation of a rhinoceros. He depicts an animal with hard plates that cover its body like sheets of armour, with a gorget at the throat, a solid-looking breastplate, and rivets along the seams; he also places a small twisted horn on its back, and gives it scaly legs and saw-like rear quarters. None of these features is present in a real rhinoceros.[4][5] Despite its anatomical inaccuracies, Dürer's woodcut became very popular in Europe and was copied many times in the following three centuries. It was regarded by Westerners as a true representation of a rhinoceros into the late 18th century. Eventually, it was supplanted by more realistic drawings and paintings, particularly those of Clara the rhinoceros, who toured Europe in the 1740s and 1750s. It has been said of Dürer's woodcut: "probably no animal picture has exerted such a profound influence on the arts".[6]" Read the full article here.

Aaah! Sunday chores...








16 comments:

martinealison said...

Je pense que tu vas réellement te faire plaisir en dessinant ces étranges animaux, restés très préhistoriques...
J'aime beaucoup la douceur des lignes... Ton poignet semble d'une telle légèreté... Un travail inouï... Bravo !

J'avais éprouvé un sentiment agréable en peignant "Grain de K-fée" qui avait comme compagnon un rhinocéros. Cette peinture est vendue et le rhinocéros avait plu à beaucoup de personnes.

Je te fais de gros bisous et j'ai hâte d'admirer le reste du troupeau !

Tammie Lee said...

that was interesting to learn more about these interesting creatures.

love seeing what you are up to. i have wondered how many pens you go through.

good Sunday to you ~

Jess said...

Wow what a lovely drawing of yours, so clean and precise! My drawings seem to get messier each time I try to draw. Hope your Sunday chores aren't too dreary! :)
xx

Steve E said...

Martinealison: "looking forward to the herd". Me, too-only "take your time", Ces. OK, I know "genius is not congruent with work-pacing...or Life-pacing--certainly not with procrastination...

As with your art...you are the BEST, girl!

Rhinoceros...who would have thought they were next. Bet even you did not know that until you bagan to sketch?
More to say another time. Too tired now, going to bed!
Thank you, Ces
PEACE!

Bella Sinclair said...

Beautiful rhino! You have to admit, though, that Dürer's rhino is amazing given he was basing it on someone else's description. That should be the basis of a book: creatures and artists' attempts based on written descriptions. That would be amusing. :) Hope you are having a carefree and relaxing Sunday. Tsup!

JaneA said...

You have a beautiful line! I really love it when someone can draw something with the minimum effort, just express the perfection with as few lines as possible. And you've done it. Perfect. Love your elephant drawings too!

Ces said...

Merci Alison. Je me précipitais et mes éléphants ont commencé à air fatigué. Juste besoin d'une pause. Je voudrais faire le dessin troupeau digne d'attention. :)

Ces said...

Hello Tammie. Thank you. Sigh, so many pens and I only like to use new pens so I do not exert a lot of pressure. I have been drawing more but my wrist feels great because I decided that at a certain point it is not worth using a pen until it is used up but I have to exert pressure. It's either be frugal with pens but risk hurting my wrist.

Ces said...

Hi Jessie. Mine too, my drawings get messy as I stay on a project for a long time, that is why I take a break with a different topic. Hope you are well. I did a lot of chores yesterday and drew in between.

Ces said...

Thank you Steve!!! I was reading about wild animals and it inspired me. Hope you got enough rest!

Ces said...

Yes, it is very difficult to draw from description. I should know - regarding the acorns, that is why it is a challenge to draw all the species because I do not have samples or photographs. :) Tsup!

Ces said...

Thank you Jane. Well, it looks easy but I really do exert effort and a lot of time. You are so kind. Thank you.

Ces said...

Ooooh I forgot! Durer's rhinoceros is Steampunk!!! Cool! He was the first steampunk illustrator!!!

Lisa Graham Art said...

This is one of those posts that makes you wish somehow you knew everything. There is history everywhere at every turn and we get to know so little of it. I wish I was God. Well, no I don't.

Your rhino is FABULOUS! Love the drawing tools too. You have a few.

Lisa Graham Art said...

Oh, and TSUP!

k.h.whitaker said...

I love the mini trashcan. You must buy pens in bulk. ;)