3/12/12

All Together Now

 
Left to right: Dom Pierre Perignon, French Benedictine monk (adapted from an image of his statue); a Fransciscan friar; a Dominican friar; a Carmelite friar; another Dominican friar and an Agustinian friar. Archival pigment pen and ink on 11"x14" Bristol Board.

Please pardon the poor quality of this image. I do not have my scanner. This image was also drawn while I was in transit. Still in love with religious habits. I loved reading about friars and monks while drawing this and the previous post's image. Do you know the difference between a friar and a monk? Gregor Mendel was a friar, while Dom Perignon was a monk, Martin Luther (before he was excommunicated) was a friar, so was St. Francis of Assisi. Why am I drawing friars? I remembered an incident that happened during my second year in nursing college. I took summer courses in political science and land reform at a Catholic university. That summer, one of the Recolletos friars died. I recall going to his wake and paying my respects. He was buried in his habit and his black cloak with the hood over his head. He looked so peaceful and holy!


I also love fabric, and sometime last month, I stumbled upon a blog where the artist was lamenting her inability to capture the drape of the fabric. Well, I love fabric and wanted to see if I can meet the challenge. I may draw a couple more before I move on to something new or pick up an old project. Have a great week everyone!

14 comments:

Lisa Graham Art said...

I want to sit down with your holy men and have a spiritual chat with them. They look friendly. Such a good drawing and you did a great job on your cloth.

Steve E said...

YOU, Ces, are an "artist of the cloth". Friar or monk, you penned the pixels and these words fell out of my head :
Sanctus
Kyrie
Kyrie Gloria
Gloria Holy
Holy, Holy
And I love those bibles--or song books--by cAc in the hands of the declared saints.
When you post, there is that happiness spread all over the Peeps who read you. Me, too!

Bella Sinclair said...

Your men are of very fine cloth. Very rich, heavy fabric! They could be religious runway models. Their robes are beautiful, but what is really catching my eye is the beautiful detailing on that building. Ooooh!

ياسمين حميد said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
martinealison said...

Une bien belle lignée... (pour juste plaisanter un peu... j'aime aussi le Saint Pérignon dans mon verre!!!)
Tu as réussi un magnifique dessin. J'aime beaucoup le travail de tes drapés.
gros bisous

ياسمين حميد said...

'pick up an old project' as in 'oaks'? ;)

Anonymous said...

i love holy men and women - of many different faiths and lineages. i love to visit them and to read their writings. the first one i ever met was at college. he was a trappist monk who had decided to spend some time in the "world." i will never forget his eyes. they were pools of love and stillness. i knew that whatever that was in his eyes, that was what i most wanted.

k.h.whitaker said...

beautiful! I love your new series Ces, but I miss seeing acorns too :)

Ted Blackman said...

This is a really nice piece, Ces. You are a master at handling grey values, and this one in particular reads so well. When will you develop the obsession to draw motorcycles, I wonder? I would enjoy an obsession like that.

Did you know I used to have a filthy habit? So I sent it to the laundry. (sorry, couldn't resist)

Tammie Lee said...

wonderful, i love the way you create folds, that is something i have much to learn about! much.

Gerry Snape said...

I have just discovered you through Steve E and poetry...and I'm amazed at your art. I went to the Hockney in The Royal Academy London last week and I'm sure you wpould love it as much as I did...a love of nature but a new way of seeing it. Your opak series is wonderful!

Gerry Snape said...

you know that I mean OAK!

Andrew Finnie said...

Hey sure I know, I know! A friar cruises around scoring cash from the peasants and a monk lives in a monk place and the peasants come to him and give him cash - or cows and stuff. So you can tell the difference because the Friars have good legs, where as the Monks are always bent over so thyey can see out of the little slidey window thing they put in the doors of the refrectory so they can see across the fields to see what the peasants are bringing.... A lot of monks ended up with scoliosis from this and they had to employ chiropractors - which is where the word 'Chiro Practor' comes from - the Latin for 'back (chiro) and 'monk straightener' (Practum) - see what you learn when you blog Ces?

Butt seriously, when I first saw this it reminded me of a Byzantium mosaic of a kingly procession where the most important person was in the middle and the least important people were on the edges.

But when I saw Dom Perignon on the edge I knew I was mistook - because, as the inventor of the bubbles in champers I just knew he would be in the middle if my theory was correct.

Ces, how you have made everything slightly off klilter, and how you have varied the textures - well it's just so good you know. It gives me joy - and that's the meaning of life. Now where did I leave my Dom? ah. it's over there next to the Jacuzzi.... I wish all those girls would go home or start wearing bikinis or something .....

Shirley said...

You've captured the draping of their robes beautifully, Ces! Goodness this is a wonderful new series..the detail is astounding!! Their faces are peaceful, their poses natural and quite thoughtful. It's lovely to see this Ces!! Hope you are well my friend! Tsup!